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Car Key Stuck in Ignition? How to Get it Unstuck and Start Your Car

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Car Key Stuck in Ignition? How to Get it Unstuck and Start Your Car

Car Key Stuck in Ignition? How to Get it Unstuck and Start Your Car

My name’s Robby, your friendly certified mechanic with over 20 years of experience repairing all types of vehicles. I know how frustrating it can be when you turn your key and it gets stuck in the ignition. But don’t sweat it – I’ve got simple tips to get you back on the road.

In this guide, I’ll walk you through why keys get stuck, step-by-step fixes you can try yourself, when to call for professional help, and how to avoid getting your car key stuck in ignition. With my deep expertise, we’ll have that key turning smooth as butter again in no time. Read on to learn what’s locking up your ignition, how to set it free, and keep those keys turning happily ever after.

Common Causes of a Stuck Ignition Key

car keys stuck in ignition

There are a few main reasons why your key may be stuck in the ignition lock cylinder. Here’s an in-depth look at each one:

The Car is Not in Park

In vehicles with automatic transmissions, the gear selector must be firmly in Park before you can remove the key. The ignition cylinder has an interlock that keeps the key from turning and coming out unless it senses the transmission is in Park.

Even if you think you’ve shifted to Park, it’s possible the selector didn’t fully seat into the Park detent. Gently shake the gear selector lever to double check that it is locked in Park. Wiggle it back and forth from Reverse to Drive and make sure it clicks firmly into Park.

For manual transmissions, the gear shifter must be smoothly shifted into Neutral without any pressure on the shift lever. Make sure it is centered in the Neutral gate before attempting to turn the key.

The Steering Wheel is Locked

If you turned the steering wheel too far left or right before turning off the engine, it can activate the steering wheel lock. This is a theft deterrent feature that locks the steering column to prevent the wheel from turning. It also prevents the key from turning in the ignition cylinder.

To unlock it, gently turn the steering wheel left and right while jiggling the key at the same time. You may need to turn the key to the Accessory or Run position first to release enough internal pressure to disengage the lock bar from the steering column.

Keep slowly turning the wheel back and forth while wiggling the key until they both unlock. The key should then turn smoothly and be removable.

Buildup of Debris and Grime

Dirt, dust, gum, crumbs, and other debris can accumulate in the ignition cylinder keyway over time. All of this grime and gunk can stick to the key and prevent it from smoothly engaging the spring-loaded tumbler pins inside the cylinder.

This buildup causes friction against the key surfaces and slots, making it hard to turn and extract the key. The more grit that works its way into the cylinder, the worse it will bind up.

Worn or Damaged Key

If your key is worn down, bent, cracked, or has any other physical imperfections, it may get stuck when inserted into the ignition and you will also need to replace the keys to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Any damage to the key blade can cause it to bind against the internal tumblers and pins without properly aligning. Even small dings and roundness from years of use can prevent a smooth turn.

Keys may also get damaged if you accidentally close it in a car door, leave it in your pocket with loose change, or toss it on a hard surface like a granite countertop. Any of these actions can eventually distort the key over time.

Faulty Ignition Cylinder

With enough wear and tear over tens of thousands of miles, the internal mechanisms of the ignition cylinder can begin to fail. The tiny spring-loaded tumbler pins that match up with your key can become bent, collapsed, or misaligned. This allows the key to wiggle around too much or jam in place.

Excess sloppiness or tightness in the cylinder prevents the key from smoothly unlocking. The whole cylinder may need replacement if cleaning and lubricating does not help.

Low Battery Charge

If the car battery is almost fully dead, there may not be enough juice left to energize the ignition cylinder and overcome the internal tumbler spring tension.

The ignition cylinder is designed to remain locked as a security feature until the correct key is inserted. But a dead battery prevents the full 12+ volts from reaching the ignition tumblers.

You’ll hear a rapid clicking sound when trying to start the engine as the starter solenoid chatters on and off. Jump starting the battery with jumper cables or charging it with a battery charger may provide enough power to unlock the cylinder.

Manufacturer Defect

In rare cases, a manufacturer defect in the ignition cylinder or related mechanisms could be causing the key to stick. There may even be a recall related to the problem.

It’s worth searching the NHTSA database online for any technical service bulletins (TSBs) or recalls associated with stuck keys for your vehicle make, model and year. The local dealer service department can also look up if any known advisories exist.

How to Get Your Car Key Unstuck

car wont turn over key stuck in ignition

If your key is stuck in the ignition for the first time, try these simple fixes:

Ensure the Car is in Park

Confirm the gear selector is firmly in Park or Neutral. If it doesn’t seem to catch, shake the gear selector and retry shifting to Park while pressing the brake. Go through the shift gate multiple times if needed.

In Park, the ignition cylinder is mechanically enabled to turn and release the key. So this is the first thing to double-check if the key won’t come out. Don’t just glance at the shifter – physically move it through each gear position to verify.

Unlock the Steering Wheel

Turn the steering wheel gently left and right while simultaneously jiggling the key. You may need to turn the key to Accessory mode first to reduce cylinder pressure.

Keep slowly turning the wheel back and forth while wiggling the key until they both unlock. If the wheel turns freely but the key is still stuck, you’ll know the problem is isolated to just the ignition cylinder.

Check for a Dead Battery

Turn on the headlights to see if they are dim. Attempt to jump start the car if the battery seems dead. Low voltage can cause unusual cylinder binding.

Listen for starter relay clicking when turning the key to Start. No click means no juice left in the battery. The ignition tumblers need full voltage to rotate to the Off position.

Lubricate the Ignition

Use a thin straw to spray WD-40, powdered graphite, or another lubricant directly into the key slot on the ignition cylinder. Insert the key and wiggle it gently. This can help release a mildly stuck key.

The lubricant seeps down along the key surface and into the cylinder core. This lets the internal tumbler pins and springs move freely so the key can turn and extract out. Be patient working the key in and out.

Clean the Key

Use rubbing alcohol on a cloth to thoroughly clean any grime, tape, dirt or debris off the key. Carefully insert it back into the ignition and retry unlocking it. Debris sticking to the key can prevent smooth engagement.

Also inspect the key tip where it inserts into the cylinder. File down any burrs or dings with a nail file or fine-grit sandpaper so it glides in without hanging up. The goal is silky smooth key edges.

Call for Professional Help

If you’ve tried all of these steps without success, it’s best to call for a locksmith or mobile mechanic near you. They have the professional tools and expertise to safely handle stuck keys and faulty ignitions. Avoid using excessive force yourself.

With specialized picks and decoders, they can precisely manipulate the internal pins while turning the lock cylinder. Years of experience also let them “feel” out the problem and apply the right tension. This finesse ensures minimal damage to the ignition components.

Removing a Broken Key

stuck car key ignition

If part of your key has broken off inside the ignition cylinder, carefully try these methods:

  • Use needle-nose pliers to remove any portion still protruding outward. Grip any nub tightly and slowly work it out. Do not push the broken piece in deeper when grasping it.
  • Try a thin jigsaw blade to pull the broken fragment out from alongside the keyhole. The blade edge can catch and extract it like a hook.
  • Specialized key extraction tools made for broken keys can grip and pull out the stuck portion. This hook tool provides great leverage.
  • As a last resort, call a professional locksmith. They can easily extract the broken key and may replace the cylinder core if needed.
  • Avoid amateur techniques like glue or hot glue as they rarely work. The glue just smears inside making removal harder.
  • NEVER try jamming in the other broken piece – it will only lodge deeper inside the ignition. Leave extraction to the pros.

Broken keys snap off because too much torque was applied trying to turn them. Always gently wiggle stuck keys instead of forcefully twisting them. Too much pressure is what leads to breaking.

Preventing Stuck Keys

You can avoid stuck key headaches by taking these preventative maintenance steps:

  • Ensure you are using the correct car key – it is easy to accidentally grab the wrong key ring. Double check the remote fob button works to verify.
  • Keep your ignition cylinder clean by periodically spraying WD-40 or another light lubricant inside it while turning the key. This prevents gunk buildup.
  • Replace worn or damaged keys immediately to prevent issues. If your key is bent or worn down, get it replaced right away.
  • Always gently turn the key without forcing it. Excessive pressure can damage the cylinder tumblers over time.
  • Confirm your steering wheel is aligned properly and not putting torque on the ignition cylinder.
  • Set the transmission fully in Park or Neutral before attempting to remove the key. Build this habit so the interlock is always disengaged.
  • Consider upgrading to a flip key or push button start if available for your vehicle. These designs eliminate cylinder wear issues.

When to Call a Mechanic

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Ignition cylinder issues often require professional diagnosis and repair. If lubricating and cleaning the key doesn’t solve your stuck key problems, it’s best to have a trusted mechanic inspect it.

They have specialized tools to test cylinders and can confirm if replacement parts are required. Some problems like tumbler pin misalignment require cylinder disassembly.

Replacing a worn or damaged ignition cylinder is usually affordable, often $200-$400. Correctly repaired ignitions should give you years of smooth operation. It’s well worth the investment to prevent being stranded with a stuck key.

Services like Mechanic Answer provide access to mechanics online who can provide guidance if you encounter sticking or broken keys. 24/7 expert advice gives you confidence in how to proceed.

While stuck keys may seem like a nuisance, driving with a worn ignition cylinder can lead to other issues like failure to start or key breakage at the worst time. Address stuck key problems promptly before they strand you.

Conclusion

Stuck keys are a common issue most drivers will experience eventually. But in most cases, you can quickly get your key unstuck with some simple troubleshooting steps. Always try safe DIY remedies first before calling for repairs. And take preventative measures like cleaning and replacing worn keys to avoid stuck ignitions in the future.

With some patience and the proper technique, you can get your key turning smoothly again. Remember to always stay calm and gently work the key free. Avoid forceful twisting to prevent snapping it off. And if all else fails, skilled locksmiths and mechanics have the specialized tools and experience to safely handle any stuck key situation and get you back on the road.

Key Stuck in Ignition Frequently Asked Questions

What to do if key is stuck in ignition and won't start?

First, ensure your automatic transmission is firmly in Park or the manual gearshift is in Neutral. Jiggle the gear selector to double check. Try turning the steering wheel left and right while turning the key to release any steering lock pressure. If the battery is dead, try jump starting it or charging it to regain power. Spray lubricant like WD-40 into the cylinder and gently work the key in and out. Use rubbing alcohol to clean any gunk off the key. If all else fails, call a professional locksmith or mechanic to extract it. Avoid forcefully twisting the key as it may break off.

How do you turn off a car when the key is stuck in the ignition?

With the key stuck, you likely won't be able to fully turn it to the Off position. But you can at least turn it backwards to the Accessory or Run position. This will power down the engine and electronics without fully unlocking the cylinder. If the key is broken, you may need to disconnect the battery terminal to cut all power. A mechanic can repair the cylinder so the key turns properly again. Avoid leaving the car running unattended with a stuck key.

Can a dead battery cause the key to be stuck in the ignition?

Yes, a dead or weak car battery that is low on voltage can definitely cause issues with the ignition cylinder and prevent the key from turning and unlocking fully. The ignition tumblers need full battery voltage to energize the electromechanical interlocks. Jump starting the battery or charging it can provide the extra power needed to get the key unstuck. Just be gentle jiggling it once voltage is restored.

What causes the ignition to lock up?

The most common causes of an ignition lockup are wear and tear on the internal tumblers, buildup of debris inside the cylinder, low battery voltage, damage to the key, and the steering wheel being locked. Issues with the gear selector or transmission not being in Park can also prevent the cylinder from turning. Getting the steering and gears positioned properly is the first step in diagnosing a locked ignition.

What does it mean when you turn the key in the ignition and nothing happens?

If all lights and electronics are dead when you turn the key, the most likely culprit is a fully drained or dead battery. Jump starting the battery and listening for the starter relay click will confirm if low voltage is causing the no-start condition. Make sure you are using the correct key as well. If the battery is good but the starter doesn't crank, the issue may be with the ignition switch itself, the starter motor, or another electrical problem.

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Where Can I Find My VIN?

Your vehicle’s unique Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) can be found on the title document, the vehicle registration, and the insurance policy. It is a series letters and numbers like this as example: WAUGC0896JA235262. The VIN can also be located on the following locations on the vehicle itself:

how to find VIN on vehicle